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TITE: Strategic Bombing for Fun and Profit

TITE: Strategic Bombing for Fun and Profit

Posted by Kevin Roust on Apr 11th 2019

Strategic Bombing for Fun and Profit

Setting Your Sights on the Enemy’s Economy and Morale

By Kevin Roust

When at last the first Soviet game turn (June IV, 1941) arrives, the Red Air Force will likely be in shambles. This is because, courtesy of the Axis’ Blitzkrieg! card, between Axis Fighters with nothing better to do and Axis Bombers conducting Sneak Airfields Attack Missions, most (usually all) of the Short-range Soviet Air units will be smoldering in the Destroyed box by the time the Soviet player can even touch them. What remains for the Soviets is, in all likelihood, at best pure Bomber force; and what can the Soviets do with a pure Bomber force?



Bomber, Man? Bummer, Man…

When using the ETO Standard and/or Optional Rules, at this point in the war an unescorted Soviet Bomber unit is little more than a target as both the Soviet DB-3s and the SB-2s are Vulnerable. Thus, a single German Fighter unit intercepts a single Soviet Bomber unit on the Dogfight table’s +4 column. (Note that more Interceptors or Bombers increases that to the +5 column!) And to what effect?

A pair of 1/2 Bomb Strength SB-2s have a 1/3 chance (if the Intercepting Fighter’s roll is exactly a 1 or 3) of making a puny 1 DV (Damage Value, meaning it must roll a 1 to Hit) Logistics Bombing attack. For the math lovers out there, that gives it a lousy net 5.5% chance of imposing a single Out of Supply marker on some nearby Axis Ground unit -- and both of those SB-2 units will probably be Damaged in the process with one likely to be Destroyed. That’s a very poor investment for the Red Air Force!

A pair of 1 Bomb Strength DB-3 units fares better (or even a DB-3 with a sacrificial SB-2 in its Mission Packet), with the same 1/3 chance of penetrating to the target, but then achieving a 3 DV Logistics Bombing attack. This translates to a net 16.6% chance of inflicting at least one Out of Supply marker with an 11.1% chance of also reducing the Axis Rail Capacity next turn. Better, but still far from a great use of Soviet Bombers.

As ground attack units, both the DB-3 and SB-2 have similarly slim odds of suppressing enemy Air units or interdicting enemy Ground units via those Missions, and a pair of these Soviet Bomber units have only a 1/3 chance of providing a single Close Support die in a Ground Battle. What is an Air Marshal to do with such poor options?


Don’t Give Up the Fight(ers)!

Thus, as the war opens the Soviet Air Force needs Fighters – the one thing that the Axis certainly clobbered during their Blitzkrieg!card’s Sneak Attack. As Escorts, the I-16 or Yak-1 ensure that one escorted Bomber per pair gets through (while the other Bomber has a 50% chance of being merely Damaged instead of Destroyed). Furthermore, if the Soviets have an Available Fighter to Intercept, the Axis player should naturally use their Fighters as Escorts rather than employing them to intercept your Bombers’ Missions.

But, with the Short-range Soviet Air units Destroyed from the Axis’ opening gambit, how can the Red Air Force rebuild its Fighters? There are two options:

1) Slowly replace those Destroyed box residents over time (for 1 Fuel Point each), or

2) Re-equipping an Available Bomber unit to form a new, Flown Fighter unit (for 1 Equipment Point each). If you really do your utmost to head off an Axis I July Air Offensive card follow-up to their Blitzkrieg!Sneak Attack, consider spending 4 EPs to re-equip 4 Bomber units to Yak-1 and Hurricane Fighter units, and then spend 4 FPs to Rush Recover them, now Ready, back up to the Available box when I July opens! It is a very expensive price to pay to wave your middle finger at the Luftwaffe thus, but the Axis certainly won’t appreciate it if you do.

The Red Air Force might also look at building IL-2s. With both Ground Attack Strength and Air-to-Air Strength, these might be able to survive where a true Bomber would fail. Two Il-2 escorted by a LaGG-3 have a group Air-to-Air Defense Strength of 4, so a typical pair of early-war Axis Interceptors would attack on the +2 column. One of the Il-2s will be shot up (or even shot down), but the other will deliver a CAS die to the Battle it is supporting. As Stalin says, “Our Red Army now needs Il-2 aircraft like the air it breathes, like the bread it eats.”


Good Night, Bombing

When playing the Campaign Game, the Soviet player gains some interesting options: Night Bombing (208.2) and Strategic Bombing (208.1). Okay, so what can the mauled menagerie of Red wrecks do with those possibilities?

Night Bombing greatly increases the survivability of Soviet Bomber units, but at a cost in accuracy. A pair of DB-3 or SB-2 units have a 2/3 chance of delivering a (combined) 1 Bomb Strength attack (e.g., 3 DV versus Logistics) even if intercepted – that is due to a combination of the automatic -2 Dogfight column for non-Night Fighter interception at night with +2 for the both Soviet Bomber units being Vulnerable; this puts the Intercept Mission’s roll on the +0 column on Dogfight table. What that means is an average cost of only one Damaged Bomber unit to the Soviets, making Logistics Night Bombing Missions an attractive choice.

Strategic Bombing also has interesting possibilities. Medium Range (M) Bomber units flying from of Nikolayev (9358) or Odessa (9059) can reach the key Romanian cities of Ploesti, Constanta, and Bucharest. Long Range (L) Bomber units can fly out of the Soviet Air Reserve (208.3) and attack these same targets until the Axis reach the mouth of the southern Bug River (putting Nikolayev in an EZOC). Alternately, StrategicBombing can strike any Objective hex when not flying from the Soviet Air Reserve. If the Soviets can deliver 3 Hits to one of these Romanian targets in the same Season, they can impact Axis FP production, Romanian Morale Points, or Romanian Morale and Personnel Points. As a bonus, flying Strategic Bombing Missions might encourage the Axis to react by spending their precious PPs and EPs building up their Air Defense.

Under the Bombsight -- Target: Romania

In the Summer of 1941, the Soviets have a decent chance of destroying one of these three key Romanian targets. Begin promptly on I July by flying a Mission Packet consisting of the TB-3 (with its 1 Bomb Strength) and either a DB-3 or SB-2 (1/2 Bomb Strength) with Night Missions. The Axis can send up a (non-Night capable) interceptor to attack on the +0 column of the Dogfight table, giving them a 2/3 chance of Damaging/Aborting the supporting DB-3/SB-2 and 1/6 chance of damaging the TB-3. Therefore, regardless of the Dogfight result, the TB-3 presses on to deliver its 1 DV attack, affording it a 1/6 chance of scoring 1 Strategic Bombing Hit. The Soviets can fly this Mission Packet every turn by swapping in an undamaged supporting DB-3/SB-2 unit in the Mission Packet and Rush Recovering the TB-3 unit (when it is Damaged).

Persistence is the essence of this endeavor, however, as the per-turn results, on average, is harrowing…


Results with One TB-3 and One SB-2, intercepted by a non-night fighter, by die roll:

    Bomb >

Dogfight |

123456
1

1 Hit

No losses

0 Hits

No losses

0 Hits

No losses

0 Hits

No losses

0 Hits

No losses

0 Hits

No losses

2

1 Hit

No losses

0 Hits

No losses

0 Hits

No losses

0 Hits

No losses

0 Hits

No losses

0 Hits

No losses

3

1 Hit

Damaged
SB-2

0 Hits

Damaged
SB-2

0 Hits

Damaged
SB-2

0 HitS

Damaged
SB-2

0 Hits

Damaged
SB-2

0 Hits

Damaged
SB-2

4

1 Hit

Damaged
SB-2

0 Hits

Damaged
SB-2

0 Hits

Damaged
SB-2

0 Hits

Damaged
SB-2

0 Hits

Damaged
SB-2

0 Hits

Damaged
SB-2

5

1 Hit

Aborted
SB-2

0 Hits

Aborted
SB-2

0 Hits

Aborted
SB-2

0 Hits

Aborted
SB-2

0 Hits

Aborted
SB-2

0 Hits

Aborted
SB-2

6

1 Hit

Damaged
TB-3;

Aborted
SB-2

0 Hits

Damaged
TB-3;

Aborted
SB-2

0 Hits

Damaged
TB-3;

Aborted
SB-2

0 Hits

Damaged
TB-3;

Aborted
SB-2

0 Hits

Damaged
TB-3;

Aborted
SB-2

0 Hits

Damaged
TB-3;

Aborted
SB-2


Filling in the Boxes

Each of these table’s 36 squares are equally likely to happen as each represents one combination of a Dogfight roll (along the left side) and a Bombing roll (along the top). For example, a Dogfight roll of 6 yields a DA result; the applied to the TB-3 and the A to its companion SB-2. Thus the TB-3 makes its 1 DV Bombing attack, which scores 1 Hit on a roll of 1 and 0 Hits on a roll of 2-6. This is why persistence pays, you need keep up the pressure until you roll enough 1s to make it worth it and suck up all the losses in the meantime.

Add the Hits, there are 6 in the 36 squares, for an average of 1/6 per attempt. Appraising the TB-3 Damage, in the 36 squares we see 6 Damage and 0 Abort results for an average of 1/6 per attempt. Thus will cost an average of 1/6 FP per attempt to Rush Recover that TB-3 to keep it continually available.

The SB-2 unit numbers are grim. Across the 36 squares it receives 12 Damage and 12 Abort results, for an average 2/3 chance each attempt that it will return to the Flown box Damaged. If the Soviets have a second SB-2 available, then each turn one of them can Recover from Flown Ready to Available to participate in that turn’s Strategic Bombing Mission while the other repairs from Flown Damaged to Flown Ready.


Even after Axis forces reach Nikolayev (shutting down its Air Base with their EZOC), the Soviets can continue striking Ploesti or Bucharest using their Long Range (L) DB-3 unit. With three DB-3 units working in tandem (two flying and one being repaired) each turn, the Red Air Force has a 1/9 chance of scoring 1 Hit each attempt, with a 1/6 chance of both flying DB-3 being damaged. Specifically, a Dogfight roll of 1, 2, 3, or 4 lets both bombers through unscathed, achieving a 1 DV attempt inflicting 1 Hit on a bombing roll of 1. A Dogfight roll of 5 aborts 1 Bomber unit, leaving the Missions with only a 1/2 DV attack (which is automatically ineffective. A Dogfight roll of 6 aborts one and damages the other Bomber unit leaving the Soviets with an ineffective bomb attack and two shot up Bomber units to show for it!

In this manner, if the Nikolayev Air Base remains operational from I July through II August 1941, the math shows the Soviets have a 22% chance of destroying the Romanian Objective hex they are focused on before the Season’s end (on IV September). It will only cost the Soviets, on average, a mere 2 FPs in Rush Recovery costs. While still hardly a war-winning venture, the odds are less grim for the Soviets under this plan than other discussed in this article and it will greatly annoy the Axis when they most need to focus their attention along the ever-shifting front.


Flak You, Too!

The Axis can substantially increase the Soviet’s cost of Strategic Bombing by building Air Defense. While flak has only slightly impacts the efficacy Strategic Bombing, the Soviets must employ more Bombers or more FPs to maintain the continuous campaign required for even a chance at success. What chance? Well, six weeks bombing from Nikolayev, plus six more at Long Range (using the four DB-3 units), provides an 18% chance of destroying the Objective, at an average cost of 4 FP. A twelve week campaign from Long Range (using the four DB-3 units) provides a 14% chance of destroying the objective.


“Math class is tough.” – Barbie

The math here is a bit complex. A pair of DB-3s have a 1/9 chance of 1 Hit (requiring a 1-4 Dogfight roll and a 1 Bombing roll); this means they have an 8/9 chance of scoring 0 Hits each turn!

In the 12 Game Turns of the Spring or Summer Seasons, there is a 24.3% chance of 0 Hits [(8/9)^12], a 36.5% chance of exactly 1 Hit [12x(1/9)x(8/9)^11], and a 25.1% chance of exactly 2 Hits [66x(1/9)^2x(8/9)^10]. That means, in sum, there is an 86% chance of a less-than-a-Destroyed (3 Hits) result that Season, or a 14% chance that the target is Destroyed.

With Flak plus a non-Night Fighter factored in, both DB-3s are Damaged or Aborted on a Dogfight roll of 3-6, and one is Damaged by Flak on a Dogfight roll of 1-2. Keeping a pair of DB-3s continuously flying will require, on average, 1 2/3 FP of Rush Recovery expense per turn for an average total of 18 FP over the Season (weather permitting)! Note that with two pairs of DB-3 alternating turns (i.e., each taking their “natural” two turns to recover back to the Available box) there is 0 FP cost.


Results with One TB-3 and One SB-2, intercepted by a non-Night Fighter plus Flak, by die roll:

Bomb >

Dogfight

1 2 3 4 5 6
1 1 Hit

Damaged

SB-2

0 Hits

Damaged
SB-2

0 Hits

Damaged
SB-2

0 Hits

Damaged
SB-2

0 Hits

Damaged
SB-2

0 Hits

Damaged
SB-2

2 1 Hit

Damaged

SB-2

0 Hits

Damaged
SB-2

0 Hits

Damaged
SB-2

0 Hits

Damaged
SB-2

0 Hits

Damaged
SB-2

0 Hits

Damaged
SB-2

3 1 Hit


Damaged

TB-3;

Damaged
SB-2

0 Hits

Damaged
TB-3;

Damaged
SB-2

0 Hits

Damaged
TB-3;

Damaged
SB-2

0 Hits

Damaged
TB-3;

Damaged
SB-2

0 Hits

Damaged
TB-3;

Damaged
SB-2

0 Hits

Damaged
TB-3;

Damaged
SB-2

4 1 Hit


Damaged
TB-3;

Damaged
SB-2

0 Hits

Damaged
TB-3;

Damaged
SB-2

0 Hits

Damaged
TB-3;

Damaged
SB-2

0 Hits

Damaged
TB-3;

Damaged
SB-2

0 Hits

Damaged
TB-3;

Damaged
SB-2

0 Hits

Damaged
TB-3;

Damaged
SB-2

5 1 Hit


Damaged
TB-3;

Aborted
SB-2

0 Hits

Damaged
TB-3;

Aborted
SB-2

0 Hits

Damaged
TB-3;

Aborted
SB-2

0 Hits

Damaged
TB-3;

Aborted
SB-2

0 Hits

Damaged
TB-3;

Aborted
SB-2

0 Hits

Damaged
TB-3;

Aborted
SB-2

6 0 Hits

Aborted
TB-3;

Aborted
SB-2

0 Hits

Aborted
TB-3;

Aborted
SB-2

0 Hits

Aborted
TB-3;

Aborted
SB-2

0 Hits

Aborted
TB-3;

Aborted
SB-2

0 Hits

Aborted
TB-3;

Aborted
SB-2

0 Hits

Aborted
TB-3;

Aborted
SB-2

With the Red Air Force remnants and a focused, persistent effort to do so, Night Strategic Bombing is a gamble for the Soviets in the Summer of 1941, but the damage to Axis FPs or Romanian MPs/PPs (not to mention messing with the Axis player’s mind) might be worth the cost (now that you know exactly what this is).


The Soviet PE-8 – At Last, a Real Strategic Bomber

Once the Soviet PE-8 unit arrives in 1942, the Soviet Strategic Bombing calculus shifts substantially. A lone PE-8 on a Night Mission is intercepted on the -2 Dogfight column, which gives the intercepting Axis Fighter only a 1/3 chance to Damage it and no chance to Abort it (meaning that PE-8 always delivers its payload). Being Night Capable, the PE-8 retains its 2 Bomb Strength at night, and so the Soviets will average 1/2 Hit per turn, and will (on average) destroy an Objective (anywhere on the map) in 6 weeks at an average cost of 2 FPs for the occasional Rush Recovery of the PE-8 to sustain its bombing campaign. If the PE-8 flies with a sacrificial IL-4 to take any Damage, the FP cost drops to 0 with no Flak and only an average of 2 FPs if the Axis have Flak. Nice!


Sacrificing an IL-4

A “Sacrificial” IL-4? What is that?

An IL-4 flying with the PE-8 as a Bombing Mission Packet absorbs any Hit from the -2 Night Dogfight, allowing the PE-8 to fly unscathed, making the PE-8 Available to fly next turn (when it can fly with another IL-4 for that Mission). The Damaged IL-4 will be repaired and be ready again in two weeks. By dedicating the PE-8 and two IL-4s to this project, the Soviets can deliver the PE-8 to target every week, without spending any FPs.

With Flak and a non-Night Fighter (-2 column) defending, both the IL-4s and the PE-8 will be Damaged with a Dogfight roll of 5 or 6. Spending 1 FP to Rush Recover the PE-8 when this happens will keep it Available every Soviet turn.



Late in the war, once Nikolayev is recaptured, the Soviets can escalate their Strategic Bombing. The PE-8 can pack a double Bombload (103.0) from a city close to their target, so their Night Missions deliver a 4 Bomb Strength attack for an average 5/3 Hit if it gets through.

Presumably, the Axis will have some Flak by then, so a lone PE-8 is always Damaged, and Aborts on 1/3 of their Missions (i.e., rolls of 5 or 6 on the -2 column of the Dogfight table). Even then, it still averages just over 1 Hit per turn, so the Soviet player can expect to destroy a Romanian Objective without needing to Rush Recover over an average six turn bombing campaign. As the front line approaches Poland, Axis Objectives at Lodz and Budapest will come into range as well.


Results with One PE-8 at Double Bomb Strength, intercepted by a non-Night Fighter and Flak, by die roll:


Bomb >

Dogfight

1 2 3 4 5 6
1 1 Hit

Damaged
PE-8

2 Hits


Damaged
PE-8

3 Hits


Damaged
PE-8

4 Hits


Damaged
PE-8

0 Hits

Damaged

PE-8

0 Hits

Damaged

PE-8

2 1 Hit

Damaged
PE-8

2 Hits

Damaged
PE-8

3 Hits

Damaged
PE-8

4 Hits

Damaged
PE-8

0 Hits

Damaged
PE-8

0 Hits

Damaged
PE-8

3 1 Hit

Damaged
PE-8

2 Hits

Damaged
PE-8

3 Hits

Damaged
PE-8

4 Hits

Damaged
PE-8

0 Hits

Damaged
PE-8

0 Hits

Damaged
PE-8

4 1 Hit

Damaged
PE-8

2 Hits

Damaged
PE-8

3 Hits

Damaged
PE-8

4 Hits

Damaged
PE-8

0 Hits

Damaged
PE-8

0 Hits

Damaged
PE-8

5 0 Hits

Aborted
PE-8

0 Hits

Aborted
PE-8

0 Hits

Aborted
PE-8

0 Hits

Aborted
PE-8

0 Hits

Aborted
PE-8

0 Hits

Aborted
PE-8

6 0 Hits

Aborted
PE-8

0 Hits

Aborted
PE-8

0 Hits

Aborted
PE-8

0 Hits

Aborted
PE-8

0 Hits

Aborted
PE-8

0 Hits

Aborted
PE-8


Axis Strategic Bombing of The Soviet Union

Strategic Bombing of MoscowThe Axis also have opportunities for Strategic Bombing. All German Bombers in TitE have a 1/2 Bomb Strength when bombing at night and are not Vulnerable. This means that a pair of German Bombers would be intercepted (at Night) on the -2 column, for a 1/3 chance that one of them is Damaged. Flak would damage the other Bomber, but even then the Axis would deliver a 1 DV Strategic Bombing attack potentially every turn. Since the Axis Bombers are Medium Range (M), they can start bombing Moscow even before Smolensk falls. During a Spring or Summer Season (which are 12 turns each), that gives them a 1/3 chance to destroy Moscow, costing the Soviets 1 MP plus 1 MP, 2 PPs, or ½ EP.


Results with Two German Bombers, intercepted by a Non-night Fighter and Flak, by die roll:

Bomb >

Dogfight/

1 2 3 4 5 6
1 1 Hit

1 Axis
Bomber

Damaged

0 Hits

1 Axis
Bomber
Damaged

0 Hits

1 Axis
Bomber

Damaged

0 Hits

1 Axis
Bomber
Damaged

0 Hits

1 Axis
Bomber
Damaged

0 Hits

1 Axis
Bomber
Damaged

2 1 Hit

1 Axis
Bomber

Damaged

0 Hits

1 Axis
Bomber
Damaged

0 Hits

1 Axis
Bomber
Damaged

0 Hits

1 Axis
Bomber
Damaged

0 Hits

1 Axis
Bomber
Damaged

0 Hits

1 Axis
Bomber
Damaged

3 1 Hit

1 Axis
Bomber

Damaged

0 Hits

1 Axis
Bomber
Damaged

0 Hits

1 Axis
Bomber
Damaged

0 Hits

1 Axis
Bomber
Damaged

0 Hits

1 Axis
Bomber
Damaged

0 Hits

1 Axis
Bomber
Damaged

4 1 Hit

1 Axis
Bomber

Damaged

0 Hits

1 Axis
Bomber
Damaged

0 Hits

1 Axis
Bomber
Damaged

0 Hits

1 Axis
Bomber
Damaged

0 Hits

1 Axis
Bomber
Damaged

0 Hits

1 Axis
Bomber
Damaged

5 1 Hit

2 Axis
Bombers

Damaged

0 Hits

2 Axis
Bombers
Damaged

0 Hits

2 Axis
Bombers
Damaged

0 Hits

2 Axis
Bombers
Damaged

0 Hits

2 Axis
Bombers
Damaged

0 Hits

2 Axis
Bombers
Damaged

6 1 Hit

2 Axis
Bombers

Damaged

0 Hits

2 Axis
Bombers
Damaged

0 Hits

2 Axis
Bombers
Damaged

0 Hits

2 Axis
Bombers
Damaged

0 Hits

2 Axis
Bombers
Damaged

0 Hits

2 Axis
Bombers
Damaged


A more aggressive Axis player could run Escorted Strategic Bombing Missions during the day, for Objectives closer to the front. For example, two He-111 units escorted by one Bf-109F flying in the Spring of 1942 could be intercepted by no better than one Soviet P-40 and one Hurricane, for the +1 column on the Dogfight Results Table. The Axis would have a 2/3 chance of a 2 DV attack and a 1/3 chance of a 1 DV attack, for an average of 7/18 of a Hit. With some substantial FPs spent Rush Recovering to sustain this offensive, it would reach an expected 3 Hits to destroy the Objective in eight weeks.


Results with Two He-111 and One Bf-109F, intercepted by One P-40 and One Hurricane, and Flak, by die roll:

Bomb >

Dogfight

1 2 3 4 5 6
1 1 Hit


Damaged
He-111

2 Hits


Damaged
He-111

0 Hits

Damaged
He-111

0 Hits

Damaged
He-111

0 Hits

Damaged
He-111

0 Hits

Damaged
He-111

2 1 Hit


2 Damaged
He-111s

2 Hits


2 Damaged
He-111s

0 Hits

2 Damaged
He-111s
0 Hits

2 Damaged
He-111s
0 Hits

2 Damaged
He-111s
0 Hits

2 Damaged
He-111s
3 1 Hit


2 Damaged
He-111s

2 Hits


2 Damaged
He-111s

0 Hits

2 Damaged
He-111s
0 Hits

2 Damaged
He-111s
0 Hits

2 Damaged
He-111s
0 Hits

2 Damaged
He-111s
4 1 Hit

1 Damaged
He-111

1 Aborted
He-111
0 Hits

1 Damaged
He-111

1 Aborted
He-111
0 Hits

1 Damaged

He-111

1 Aborted
He-111

0 Hits

1 Damaged

He-111

1 Aborted
He-111

0 Hits

1 Damaged
He-111

1 Aborted
He-111
0 Hits

1 Damaged
He-111

1 Aborted
He-111
5 1 Hit

2 Damaged
He-111s

1 Aborted
Bf-109F
2 Hits

2 Damaged
He-111s

1 Aborted
Bf-109F
0 Hits

2 Damaged
He-111s

1 Aborted
Bf-109F
0 Hits

2 Damaged
He-111s

1 Aborted
Bf-109F
0 Hits

2 Damaged

He-111s

1 Aborted
Bf-109F

0 Hits

2 Damaged
He-111s

1 Aborted
Bf-109F
6 1 Hit

1 Damaged
He-111


1 Killed
He-111

0 Hits

1 Damaged

He-111

1 Killed
He-111

0 Hits

1 Damaged
He-111

1 Killed
He-111

0 Hits

1 Damaged
He-111

1 Killed
He-111
0 Hits

1 Damaged
He-111


1 Killed
He-111

0 Hits

1 Damaged

He-111

1 Killed
He-111


Hitting the Target

The options for Strategic Bombing are even more nuanced in other theatres of Frank Chadwick’s ETO as you will see in future game releases. Extreme (X) Range (mostly American and British) Heavy Bombers can deliver large bomb loads across great distances, and longer-range Fighters will be able to provide them daytime escort.

Conversely, Night Missions become more dangerous with the availability of Night Fighters to intercept them. The skies are anything but friendly in this technological war in the air over Europe during WWII.